#conservation instagram hashtag photos and videos

Most popular images with #conservation

conservation medias

National Geographic

Photos by @brentstirton | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // African Parks is a nonprofit conservation organization that takes on the rehabilitation and management of national parks, in partnership with governments and local communities. I photographed in five parks, and in the course of that whirlwind tour, I caught a glimpse of the extraordinary effort to conserve endangered species in some of the toughest places. This included black rhino care and translocation, rare Kordofan giraffes, West African lions and crocodiles, and the world’s largest elephant herd. African Parks currently manages 16 national parks and protected areas in 10 countries, covering almost 11 million hectares. That represents the largest and most diverse portfolio of parks under management on the African continent. They do this job with a skeleton crew, often living in spartan conditions for years at a time. It’s an incredible effort to ensure the survival of a global conservation heritage. Their goal to is have 20 parks under management by 2020. I’m very grateful to all the AP people who helped us tell their story. @africanparksnetwork #conservation #endangeredspecies #CampaignforNature

National Geographic

Photo by Ami Vitale @amivitale | Here, Fatu and Najin, daughter and mother—and the last two northern white rhinos on the planet—drink water in the days before the first ever egg extraction was attempted on them, by an international consortium of scientists and conservationists from @olpejeta @kenyawildlifeservice @leibnizizw #Avantea and @safariparkdvurkralove. The historic undertaking was a bold attempt to bring this species back from certain extinction. It was a success, with a total of ten eggs were extracted from the two (five each). Those eggs were matured and fertilized with sperm frozen from deceased northern white rhino males. Two embryos resulted and they are now stored in liquid nitrogen to be transferred into a surrogate mother in the near future. While much is still to be done, a pivotal turning point has been reached and my heart is full of cautious hope for this gentle, otherworldly species. @bmbf.bund @biorescue_project @leibnizgemeinschaft #NorthernWhiteRhinos #stopextinction #rhinos #conservation #kenya

National Geographic

Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @mitty | It's World Animal Day! A brown pelican at rest, wrapped in a cocoon of feathers the color of chocolate. Meeting this pelican on a recent expedition to the Galápagos, I wanted to capture the texture of its plumage, which to me looks like one of those fancy cloaks the ancient Inca priests used to wear. This bird in particular has an air of wisdom about it, as if it might unfurl its wings and divulge secrets from an age long past, or perhaps our present. Today birds all over the world have been discovered dead, their bellies bloated and full of plastic. Some parents have even been photographed feeding their young bits of plastic including plastic caps, lighters, and cigarette butts. Seabirds depend on a healthy ocean as much as the fish that they eat. Follow me @mitty to learn how you can have an impact and live a more sustainable lifestyle by taking the @NatGeo plastic pledge. #galapagos #conservation #planetorplastic #HydrateLike #worldanimalday

National Geographic

Photo by Mattias Klum @mattiasklumofficial | A Geoffroy's spider monkey, in the rainforest of Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. This amazing and endangered primate has a range from Mexico to Panama. This is the largest of the monkeys of Costa Rica, with males averaging 8.2 kg (18 lb) and females averaging 7.7 kg (17 lb). It has long, slim arms and a long, prehensile tail. #savetherainforest #conservation #spidermonkey #osapeninsula #costarica

National Geographic

Photo by Frans Lanting @franslanting | A lone bull elephant stands at the edge of a water hole, swaying his tail and rumbling as only elephants can do, while the sky turns blood red on a winter evening in Botswana. I share this image to mark World Elephant Day, a time to reflect on what elephants mean to us, what we’ve been doing to them, and what we can do for them. I’d like to draw attention to the organizations that have forged a strong coalition aimed at reversing the poaching crisis that has decimated elephant populations almost everywhere. The @ElephantCrisisFund was established by @SaveTheElephants in partnership with @LeonardoDiCaprioFdn and @WildNetOrg. They support the right people in the right places and they are making a real difference. Check them out and lend your support so they can do even better. And follow @FransLanting for more intimate encounters with elephants. @ThePhotoSociety #elephants #respect #dignity #conservation #wonder

National Geographic

Photo by Brent Stirton @brentstirton | Benin/Burkina Faso border, May 2019: Three mud-spattered young men emerge exhausted from a day of waist-deep mud fishing in a lake where fishing is banned for conservation reasons. The villagers of Sanjou live on the edge of Pendjari National Park, and they are permitted to engage in this fishing festival for only three days every three years. All the villagers bring nets and baskets, and within moments it’s a mud-soaked frenzy, with over 3,000 people in the water. Fishing camps are banned within the park and in border areas, as they often become poaching camps. Fish populations also desperately need to recover from unrelenting commercial operations. The park employs locals for all its work as a means of compensation, and there seems to be understanding as a result. Pendjari anchors the transnational West-Arly–Pendjari reserve, which covers 35,000 square kilometers. This is the largest remaining intact ecosystem in West Africa and is still in a state of mismanagement. The nonprofit African Parks hopes to resolve that by initially addressing Pendjari while working alongside the government of Benin, which has invited the group in. This image is part of coverage for a story on @africanparksnetwork for an upcoming issue of @natgeo magazine. #conservation #fishing #benin #fishing #africa

National Geographic

Photos by Ami Vitale @amivitale | In a historical undertaking, a consortium of the world's leading experts from @leibnizizw, Avantea, @safariparkdvurkralove, and @kenyawildlifeservice performed an ovum pick-up (a procedure for extracting oocytes) on the last living northern white rhinos, Fatu and Najin, at @olpejeta conservancy in northern Kenya. This procedure, never before performed on any northern white rhino, could mark that instant when these creatures were brought back from certain extinction. At this very moment, the precious ova are being rushed to Italy, where they will eventually be matured and fertilized with frozen northern white rhino sperm to become embryos—which could then be transferred into southern white rhinos to gestate the embryos. If this new technology is successful, it could bring a critically endangered species back from extinction. @biorescue_project @leibnizgemeinschaft #NorthernWhiteRhinos #stopextinction #rhinos #conservation #kenya

National Geographic

Photos by Cristina Mittermeier @cristinamittermeier | A quarter of all shark species are at risk of extinction. Around the world, we are fishing many shark species faster than they can reproduce, and once over-fished, sharks will take a long time to recover—if they can recover. We can be angry and heartbroken, but we also can go deeper to understand why this problem exists and rectify it. We need stronger management and legislation in place to protect them. Thankfully, the world is starting to wake up to the crisis sharks face, but we need more voices to join us. Please help me in preserving their beauty and start #TurningTheTide for sharks at @cristinamittermeier. #ocean #conservation #CITES4Sharks

National Geographic

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Samburu warriors (known as moran) meet a black rhino at Sera Conservancy, in northern Kenya. The Samburu reserve was home to black rhino for thousands of years, until the last was poached in 1990. The species was once widespread across Africa, but illegal wildlife trade and lack of secure habitat resulted in a 98% collapse in numbers between 1960 and 1995; now an estimated 5,500 individuals are left in the wild. Kenya is one of the black rhino’s last strongholds, with approximately 690 animals. In May 2015 the Kenya Wildlife Service, Northern Rangelands Trust, and Lewa Wildlife Conservancy partnered to move 10 black rhino to the 120-square-kilometer conservancy. It became the country’s first community-owned black rhino sanctuary, allowing the Samburu who once lived cheek by jowl with black rhino to again live alongside them. To see more follow me @chancellordavid @lewa_wildlife @nrt_kenya #seraconservancy @natgeo @thephotosociety #conservation #Rhino #worldrhinoday

National Geographic

Photo by Cory Richards @coryrichards | Walruses approach an expedition boat from a haul-out on Hooker Island. During summer, when sea ice diminishes, walruses congregate on shorelines, where food is scarce and youngsters can get trampled. Captured #onassignment in the #arctic of Franz Josef Land, Russia. #followme @coryrichards for more images about #conservation and our fragile Earth.

National Geographic

Video and photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | In northern Kenya an initiate from the Samburu people prepares for his passage into manhood. He wears the blue beads defining his status, along with vulture quills and on the very end of the necklace, wing covers from beetles—all signifying his metamorphosis from boy to moran (warrior) and the flight from the home where he’s spent his entire life up to this point. His family now will be other moran from his clan. For the next 13 years, he'll live alongside them in the bush. Once initiated, the beads will pass to his mother, who will wear them and remember her child, now fledged the nest. Today lion skins and vultures quills are sourced from Kenya Wildlife Services, which distributes them to the Samburu from natural animal mortalities, thus negating the necessity to kill wildlife. To see more follow me @chancellordavid #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #conservation

National Geographic

Photo by Brent Stirton @brentstirton | Tarangire National Park, Tanzania: A mature bull elephant schools a younger bull that was getting ahead of himself in a herd of males. The older bull pushed the younger elephant around until it was completely humbled and resumed its place in the hierarchy of the herd. One of the neglected issues of the ivory poaching crisis is that so many of the mature bulls are killed and there are very few to socialize young elephants into behavior patterns that will increase their lifespan. Human-wildlife conflict is often the result as inexperienced elephants wander into territory that can get them killed. @natgeo #natgeostudentexpeditions #conservation #wildlife #nature

National Geographic

Photo by Mattias A. Klum @mattiasklumofficial | A young Galápagos marine iguana seems as if it's considering a pedicure. The patterns and coloration on each and every individual iguana are unique. The Galápagos iguanas are believed to have had a common ancestor that floated out to the islands from the South American continent on rafts of vegetation millions of years ago. They are the world's only marine lizard species. #galapagos #conservation #darwin #beauty #marineiguana Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see more images and stories from projects around the world. @thephotosociety

Outdoor Channel

"The innocence of children, the value of wildlife and the seriousness of conservation are all summed up in this image where my children, Trail and Brooke, hold a rhino horn while flanked by two individuals prepared to fight for the species!" - @Ivan.Carter⠀ -⠀ Watch Wildlife Heroes every Monday night at 9:30 PM ET for more conservation success stories!⠀ -⠀ #WhatGetsYouOutdoors #conservation #huntingisconservation #poachers #Huntervationist @KidsInConservation #africa #Rhino

National Geographic

Photos by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | At Liwonde National Park, in Malawi, I had the enormous privilege and pleasure to work with the British Army, documenting their lives while working in this beautiful part of the planet. These are also challenging environments to work in. It was very clear that those who chose to carry out this work knew the risks, and they did so simply because they could, should, and wanted to help protect the planet's wildlife and ecosystems. Operation Corded, the name given to the army's counter-poaching deployment in Malawi, assists in training rangers in a bid to help them crack down on the illegal wildlife trade. Park rangers are taught skills such as tracking, partnered patrolling, communications, surveillance, and intelligence sharing. An armed patrol of British soldiers and African park rangers was walking through tall grass up to 7 feet (2.1 m) high when they disturbed an unseen herd of elephants. It's worth noting that it's for this very reason that poachers chose to raze the park to the ground: in order to see wildlife more easily and thus slaughter it more easily. Mathew Talbot, 22, of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, was charged and killed by an elephant. This is a reminder of the danger faced by those who choose to protect some of the world's most endangered species from those who seek to profit from the criminal slaughter of wildlife. As the sun sets in Malawi, RIP Guardsman Talbot and all those who pay the ultimate price for conservation. Follow me @chancellordavid to see more #malawi #conservation #stoppoaching #elephants #Rhino @everydayextinction @thephotosociety

National Geographic

Photo by Christian Ziegler @christianziegler | A male wreathed hornbill flies toward his nest in a tree cavity, where the female is incubating their eggs. Like all hornbills, the female is sealed into the nest behind a wall of mud that keeps the eggs and young chicks safe from predators. The female does not leave the nest until after the chicks have hatched and grown (usually 3 or 4 months), and during this time she is completely dependent on her partner her food. In collaboration with @uwicer, the Ugyen Wangchuk Institute for Conservation and Environment Research, Bhutan. @insidenatgeo supported me with a grant for this work. #bhutan #conservation #RoyalManasNationalPark #himalayas Follow me @christianziegler for more wildlife and nature stories.

National Geographic

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Gabra house, northern Kenya. The Gabra, a nomadic tribe of 31,000 people, occupy territory east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, along the edge of the Chalbi Desert, extending to Ethiopia. For the Gabra, living in balance with a trying environment requires that they protect land, animal, and fellow Gabra. Thus, they practice certain food and plant taboos, preserve full-grown trees called "korma" (bulls), and revere pregnant women and pregnant animals. As resource managers, they migrate to the highlands during the rainy season to allow the dry-season pasture to replenish its water resources, taking homes, livestock, and all possessions with them. Perhaps most symbolic of the Gabra's identity is the proverb "a poor man shames us all." Since mutual support is imperative for their survival as nomads, no Gabra are allowed to go hungry, go without animals, or be refused hospitality or assistance. A person who refuses to help others is labeled "al baku," a stigma that stays affixed to the family for generations. #withbutterfliesandwarriors #northernkenya #kenya #conservation #fightingextinction

National Geographic

Photo by @amivitale | A giant panda cub wakes up from nap time in the incubator room at the Bifengxia Giant Panda Breeding and Research Center in Sichuan Province, China. At birth, pandas are blind and weigh only a few ounces, but in six months they can grow to 88 pounds. After years of research, scientists have learned how to successfully breed pandas in captivity. With an adult population estimated at more than 1,864 wild pandas and 500 captive pandas, they have been upgraded from endangered to threatened. In a region where bad environmental news is common, China is on its way to successfully saving its most famous ambassador. I recently published my book, Panda Love, featuring my long-term work on these adorable ambassadors made on assignment for @NatGeo. Learn more about this and other conservation successes at @amivitale. #China #pandamonium #pandas #giantpanda #conservation

National Geographic

Photo by Mattias A. Klum @mattiasklumofficial | Early morning in Danum Valley, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. I have been fortunate enough to have spent a lot of time over the years in the magnificent Bornean rainforest, a realm filled with miracles big and small. This forest is estimated to be at least 130 million years old, making it one of the oldest rainforests in the world (and twice as old as the Amazon). Borneo is extremely rich in biodiversity, providing habitat for about 15,000 known species of flowering plants, and more than 3,000 tree species, 221 terrestrial mammal species, and 420 bird species. It is essential for mankind to save these remarkable ecosystems to secure global stability and resilience. To do that, we can support rainforest conservation and try to avoid products containing uncertified palm oil. Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see more images and stories from projects around the world. #borneo #Biodiversity #conservation #rainforest #beauty @thephotosociety

National Geographic

Photos by Christian Ziegler @christianziegler and Joris van Alphen @jorisvanalphen | We captured these two leopards in our camera traps—one at an elevation of 2,000 meters in the Himalaya, and the other at sea level, in Royal Manas National Park, Bhutan. Big cats, like these leopards, need large home ranges to hunt sufficient prey. To maintain healthy populations of wild cats, we need to protect large expanses of undisturbed habitat. In Bhutan, more then 50% of the country is under protection, and undisturbed habitat extends from 100 meters above sea level to over 5,000 meters. @insidenatgeo supported me with a grant for this work. #bhutan #conservation #himalayas #RoyalManasNationalPark Follow me @christianziegler for more wildlife and nature stories.

National Geographic

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | Sleeping bull elephant, Eastern Cape, South Africa. This is from my work on the sedation of elephants; when administered, a new and delicate combination of drugs allows an elephant to gently slip into a deep, calm sleep, but the important thing is it sleeps on its feet—thus reducing the possibility of all manner of eventualities should it collapse, as often happens. This bull elephant is being worked on while he gently dozes, but it’s always possible that unexpected stimulation will wake a sedated animal. I'm privileged to witness the care and attention those who work with these precious creatures exhibit when intervention is the only alternative. #southafrica #conserving #conservation #wildlife #elephants

National Geographic

Photo by Pete McBride @pedromcbride | Samburu women in northern Kenya sing and dance, which is common in their culture, but on this day they celebrate their recent successes as business leaders in their community. By selling their beaded artwork via a program with @nrt_kenya and @Beadworkskenya, they earn enough supplemental income to pay school fees for their children, and they manage those finances with mobile phone banking. In turn, such community-led initiatives are indirectly protecting wildlife across Kenya by creating economic alternatives to poaching and/or overgrazing. For more on this program follow @pedromcbride. #kenya #beadworks #women #empowerment #conservation @usaid

Eric Juergens

Ouch! Tokay geckos bite surprisingly hard! This little female was relentless; she stayed latched to my finger for some time. With a gecko in one hand, and my camera in the other, I was able to capture this moment of pain 😆. I remember when I brought one of my large male tokays home, I tried getting some macro photos of his face. He ended up staying latched to my thumb for about an hour. Being the not so little monsters they are, you can imagine their diet is impressive. Tokay geckos are strictly carnivorous. They’ll eat pretty much any insect they see, other lizards, and very young rodents. Tokay geckos are in my opinion one of the coolest lizards out there. They are a nocturnal species of true gecko that is native to Asia and parts of the Pacific Islands. Their name is an onomatopoeia for the sound they make. Males will call out at night, sounding off “tokayyy!” During the Vietnam War, American soldiers would hear this unusual sound. When they found out the sound came from these geckos, the soldiers dubbed them “f*** you lizards.” They certainly have that f**k you attitude. Of course, that name didn’t stick. This guy was caught out of the wilds of Florida, and now lives with me. Photographed with a Nikon D750, SB600 flash, and 105mm macro lens. #tokaygecko #tokay #gecko #lizards #reptilesofinstagram #exotic #invasivespecies #animal #animals #wildlife #photography #conservation #jaw_dropping_shots #macromood #Macro #herpetology #biology #herping #wildlifephotography #wildlifeconservation #Florida #southflorida #everglades #nikon #nikonusa #nikonnofilter.

Eric Juergens

Checkout this beautiful Madagascan radiated tortoise! I guess Bindi wanted to be in the photo, too 😆. This gorgeous species is native to Southern Madagascar, but can be found throughout the island. Unfortunately, these little beauties are in trouble. Habitat loss has caused their population to decrease to a critical level. People like Jason, who produce these animals, assure us that the once abundant tortoises don’t disappear from our planet. Photographed with a Nikon D750 and 10-18mm fisheye lens. This specific radiated tortoise was produced by @jason3jsabels. #madagascanradiatedtortoise #tortoise #turtle #tortoises #turtles #turtlesofinstagram #reptilesofinstagram #naturephotography #endangeredspecies #endangered #animal #animals #wildlife #photography #wildlifeconservation #wildlifephotography #conservation #madagascar #Florida #southflorida #nikon #nikonusa #nikonnofilter #threejaystortoisesanctuary

National Geographic

Photo by Christian Ziegler @christianziegler | An endangered Gee's golden langur (Trachypithecus geei) licks clay from her fingers in the Himalayan foothills. In 2017 and 2018, I spent months in Bhutan tracking and photographing these beautiful primates. I found they regularly visited an exposed clay cliff where they would eat handfuls of mineral-rich clay, which likely helps them to digest leaves and unripe fruits. The Gee’s golden langur is safe in Bhutan, but fewer than 6,500 individuals remain in the wild and it's locally extinct across parts of its historic range. In collaboration with @uwicer, the Ugyen Wangchuk Institute for Conservation and Environment Research, Bhutan. @insidenatgeo supported me with a grant for this work. @thephotosociety #bhutan #conservation #RoyalManasNationalPark #himalaya Follow me @christianziegler for more wildlife and nature stories.

National Geographic

Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @cristinamittermeier | Scattered like a string of pearls across 2,000 km of the South Pacific lies beautiful French Polynesia, a series of tropical archipelagos and remote islands in the South Pacific Ocean. A total of 118 islands encompass the area, all of them stunning and all of them with coral reefs as unique as your thumbprint. The structure of the reef varies widely between locations, but overall provides a thriving habitat for more than 800 species of fish. #followme at @CristinaMittermeier for more photos and stories of a beautiful youth-lead coral restoration project happening in French Polynesia. #coralreef #ocean #Biodiversity #conservation @coralgardeners

National Geographic

Photo by Christian Ziegler @christianziegler | A rufous-necked hornbill brings a fig for his partner in Royal Manas National Park, Bhutan. The female is incubating their eggs in the nest inside a tree cavity–you can just see the tip of her beak. She is encased behind a wall of mud that keeps the eggs and young chicks safe from predators. The female does not leave the nest until after the chicks have hatched and grown (usually 3 or 4 months), and during this time she is completely dependent on her partner for food, delivered through the small opening to the nest–seeds, fruits, lizards, frogs, and insects. @natgeo supported me with a grant for this work #bhutan #conservation #RoyalManasNationalPark #himalayas Follow me @christianziegler for more wildlife and nature stories.

🇮🇳SHOUTOUT & PROMOTION🇮🇳

#followguys @anss_usman @indian_great_shoutout ___________________________ 🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏 #_follow_guys_👉 #keepsupporting #nature #love #moodygrames #Streets_Vision #swimming #naildesign #manicure #loveinstagoodlike1 #shoutouts #rajkotdiaries #eater #wordsmatter #superdancer #mumbaidancers #thespaceslike #design #cbracing #conservation #itz_mumbai #omfg #bollywoodupdates #voompla #Likeforfollow #nikonphotography #dslr #photographers ___📷📷📷____ ____________________ @indian_great_shoutout 📷___📷📷📷____📷 👆👆👆👆👆 _____________________

🇮🇳SHOUTOUT & PROMOTION🇮🇳

#followguys @anss_usman @indian_great_shoutout ___________________________ 🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏 #_follow_guys_👉 #keepsupporting #nature #love #moodygrames #Streets_Vision #swimming #naildesign #manicure #loveinstagoodlike1 #shoutouts #rajkotdiaries #eater #wordsmatter #superdancer #mumbaidancers #thespaceslike #design #cbracing #conservation #itz_mumbai #omfg #bollywoodupdates #voompla #Likeforfollow #nikonphotography #dslr #photographers ___📷📷📷____ ____________________ @indian_great_shoutout 📷___📷📷📷____📷 👆👆👆👆👆 _____________________

National Geographic

Photo by Paul Nicklen @PaulNicklen | An Antarctic fur seal relaxes atop a cliff overlooking the Subantarctic landscape of South Georgia. Having reached shore after a winter spent at sea, this seal arrived with the intention to breed among the thousands of seals that inhabit the island’s beaches. Although the species was once in severe danger from overhunting, their population has rebounded significantly in recent years, with their numbers now likely in the millions. #followme at @PaulNicklen for more photos of wildlife from around the world. #furseal #southgeorgia #conservation #ocean

National Geographic

Photo by @FransLanting | Jaguars are the largest cats of the Americas, but this male was exceptionally massive. Jaguars grow big in Brazil’s Pantanal wetlands because of an abundance of prey that includes capybaras and caiman. When I first went there years ago, jaguars were practically invisible because they were persecuted by ranchers. But in parts of the Pantanal where they are no longer harassed, they can now be seen in the open—evidence that protection works. Follow me @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more close encounters with the wild. @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoImageCollection #jaguar #Brazil #pantanal #bigcats #conservation #bigcatsinitiative #wildlife

National Geographic

Photo by Mattias A. Klum @mattiasklumofficial | I photographed this elegantly camouflaged chital deer while on assignment in Kanha National Park, India. Predators of the chital include wolves, tigers, Asiatic lions (in Gir), leopards, Indian rock pythons, dholes, mugger crocodiles, and humans. The name chital comes from the Bengali word chitral(চিত্রল)/chitra (চিত্রা), which means "spotted." Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see more images and stories from projects around the world. #madhyapradesh #kanha #conservation #savetigers #india @thephotosociety

National Geographic

Photo by @pedromcbride | With roughly 5,000 left in the wild, the black rhino continues to face extreme poaching dangers for its horn that is biologically no different than a toenail. Amazingly, one place is bucking the trend. @lewa_wildlife has not lost a rhino, thanks to a network of protectors and protection that enable rhinos like Wai Wai and her baby to thrive. Amazed to witness Lewa evolve from a cattle ranch to a wildlife sanctuary that now boasts 14 percent of Kenya's rhino population (black and white). To see more, follow @pedormcbride @nrt_kenya #kenya #Rhino #conservation #africa #nature #wildlife #goodnews #petemcbride

National Geographic

Photo by @brentstirton | Ennedi, Chad: In the remote northeast, no place is more surreal and beautiful than the recently created Ennedi Natural and Cultural Reserve. African Parks has recently taken over management of this unique 40,000-square-kilometer UNESCO World Heritage Site, partnering with the government of Chad to help preserve this region. African Parks is a non-profit conservation organization that takes on responsibility for the rehabilitation and long-term management of difficult national parks, in partnership with governments and local communities. Their goal is to manage 20 parks by 2020, rebuilding them into models for conservation. This is no small challenge, and I truly applaud African Parks for its vision and especially the small teams on the ground making this a reality, no matter how tough the mission. Ennedi has had a wild history. It was a focal point for the “Toyota Wars,” a period from 1983-1987 when Libya invaded this region of Chad, and the Chadians took on Libyan tanks using only Toyota 4x4s, superior tactics, and no small measure of courage. Today the region is finally landmine free—and potentially one of the most unique eco-tourism experiences in the world when restored to its full potential. @africanparksnetwork #Ennedi @natgeo #conservation #chad #rangers #landscape